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British Land Weapons and Vehicles

Please note that this not a complete list of British weapons.

9mm Pistol Automatic L9A1

7.62mm L4A2 LMG

7.62mm L1A1 SLR

M79 Grenade Launcher

105mm L118 Field Gun

5.56mm M16 Assault Rifle

BAe Rapier SAM

7.62mm L42A1 Sniper Rifle

Blowpipe SAM

Stinger

M203 Grenade Launcher

L14A1 84mm Infantry Gun, 'Carl Gustav'

FV101 Alvis Scorpion

LAW

FV106 Samson Field Recovery Tractor

51mm Mortar

L16 81mm Mortar

FV 107 Scimitar

9mm L2A3 Sterling SMG

Full Tracked Articulated Carrier LHD Bv202E

120mm BAT L6 Wombat

Centurion Beach Armoured Recovery (CEBARV)

7.62mm L7A2 GPMG

 

The 9mm L9A1 Browning pistol, of Belgian design, is a reliable, recoil-operated, magazine-fed, semi-automatic pistol with a maximum effective rang of 50 metres. 

9mm Pistol Automatic L9A1

Calibre

9mm

Length (m)

0.196

Length of barrel (m)

0.112

Weight empty (kg)

0.88

Weight loaded (kg)

1.1

Muzzle velocity (m/s)

354

Magazine capacity

13 rounds

Rate of fire

Single shot

Maximum effective range (m)

40-50

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Known as the SLR (Self Loading Rifle) and is known for is straightforward fieldstripping and robust nature. The L1A1 is the British version of the Belgian FN FAL rifle. The L1A1 is a reliable, hard-hitting, gas-operated, magazine-fed semi-automatic rifle.

7.62mm L1A1 SLR

Calibre

7.62mm

Length (m)

1.143

Length of barrel (m)

0.5334

Weight empty (kg)

4.337

Weight loaded (kg)

5.074 with 20 round magazine

Muzzle velocity (m/s)

838

Magazine capacity

20 or 30 rounds

Rate of fire

40

Maximum effective range (m)

600+

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The 105mm light gun is a versatile, air portable and airmobile artillery piece that can be carried around the battlefield under slung from a Puma or Chinook. In service since 1975 having replaced the 105mm Pack Howitzers. Robust and reliable, the gun proved its worth in the Falklands, firing up to 400 rounds per day. Traverse 11 degrees and Elevation -5.5 to +70 degrees

105mm L118 Field Gun

Calibre

105mm

Length (metres)

7.01 firing at 0 degrees

Wheel Base width (metres)

1.42

Weight (kg)

1,858 in action

Ammunition

HE L31 (15.1kg), HESH L42 (10.49kg), Smoke L51 (15.98kg)

Range (metres)

17,200 firing HE; Minimum Range 2,500m firing HE

Rate of Fire (rounds per minute)

6

Crew

6

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Blindfire Rapier is a radar-equipped version of the Rapier SAM defence system used by the RAF Regiment and British Army for point air defence. The operator still retains the option of optical targeting if the radar fails to lock onto the target, but if radar is selected the engagement sequence is automatic. The radar has a range of about 12km. The fire unit usually carries four missile ready to fire and can be manually reloaded. It also requires a separate generator and, if required, radar units. The Tracked Rapier version is a tracked flatbed self-contained truck mounting a Rapier fire unit on its bed holding eight missiles ready for launch. The system is in constant development and can be made ready to fire (Tracked Rapier) in less than fifteen seconds.

BAe Rapier SAM

Length (m):

2.235

Body Diameter (m):

0.133

Fin Span (m):

0.381

Weight of Fire Unit

1,227kg

Weight of Generator Unit

243kg

Weight of Missile

42.6kg

Radar Weight

1,186kg

Optical Tracker Weight

119kg

Range

400-6,500m

Maximum Speed

Mach 2 plus

Ceiling

3,000m

Launch Weight (kg):

42.6

Weight of Warhead (kg):

1.4

Type of Warheads available:

High Explosive Semi-Armour Piercing

Maximum Range (km):

6.8

Minimum Range (km):

400m

Maximum Velocity (km/h):

Mach 2+

Maximum altitude (m):

3000m

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Light SAM system designed to provide organic air defence for infantry units. Withdrawn and replaced by Javelin. Blowpipe was a heavy weapon and of only limited use against fast jets. The weapon did how ever have some success on East Falkland against low flying Argentine Pucaras and Helicopters.

Shorts Blowpipe SAM

Body Diameter

76.2

Fin Span

0.274

Length of missile (m)

1.349

Weight of missile (kg)

11

Warhead

2.2kg (4.85lb) proximity fused HEAT/blast

Fire Post

Length of Launcher (m)

 

Weight of Launcher: loaded (kg)

21.2 with IFF (19.39kg without)

Launch velocity (m/s)

 

Maximum effective range (m)

3,000

Maximum Altitude (m)

 

Crew for Fire Post

1

Sensors and Guidance

 

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A Shoulder launched Surface to Air Missile employed by the SAS. The Stinger is a man portable, infra-red (IR) homing (heat seeking) air defense guided missile. The Stinger is designed to counter high speed,
low-level, ground attack aircraft. The Stingers had been supplied to the SAS by the United States Government. Staff Sergeant O'Connor of the SAS had been trained on the weapon and it was intended that he would teach other troopers how to use the weapon. Sadly O'Connor was killed along with 21 others when the Sea king he was aboard crashed into the sea on the 19th of May. He was carrying all the Stinger training manuals at the time. This did not stop the SAS putting the weapon to good use and on the 21st of May a senior NCO of D Squadron Air Troop successfully shot down a Argentine Pucara using a Stinger.

Stinger

Guidance

Passive IR/UV Homing - Fire and Forget

Speed

Supersonic

Length of Missile (m)

1.52

Diameter of Missile (m)

0.07

Wingspan of Missile (m)

0.091

Weight of Missile (kg)

10.1

Warhead

3kg HE-Framentation and Impact Fused

Maximum effective range (m)

5,000

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Medium Anti-armour Weapon (MAW) Designed to be carried by one soldier and operated by a crew of 2, the weapon is "recoilless" because the gases produced when the round is fired are vented through the rear of the weapon. This high-velocity discharge of gas counterbalances the recoil of the weapon. This allows the Carl Gustav to engage armoured targets within 400 m to 700 m, depending on the type of ammunition used.

Gustav 84 mm anti tank weapon

Length of barrel (m)

1.13

Weight (kg)

16

Armour Penetration (mm):

228, with HEAT round striking at 60 degrees

Muzzle velocity (m/s)

160

Ammunition

2.59kg HEAT L40A4 round

Rate of fire:

6

Maximum effective range (m)

Mobile: 400 Stationary: 500

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 66mm HEAT (high explosive anti-tank) is a one shot missile contained in its own launcher tube. Once fired, the tube can be discarded. This weapon has a range of 300m and can penetrate up to 300mm of armour. It measures just 65cm long when collapsed and weighs under 3kg. 

66mm LAW

Calibre

66mm

Length (cm)

65cm collapsed

Weight of barrel (kg)

 

Weight loaded (kg)

3kg

Elevation (degrees)

 

Muzzle velocity (m/s)

 

Rate of fire

Single shot disposable launcher

Ammunition:

HE L3682 4.2kg

Maximum effective range (m)

300m

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The 51 mm Light Mortar is a weapon that can be carried and fired by one man, and is found in the Headquarters of an infantry platoon. The mortar can fire HE, smoke and illuminating rounds.

Calibre

51mm

Length (m)

750mm

Weight of barrel (kg)

12.7

Weight loaded (kg)

6.275

Rate of fire

8 bombs per minute

Maximum effective range (m)

750m

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Fires all standard 81mm NATO and British mortar bombs. Man portable with a three-man crew and combat proven in the Falklands. It performs so well that the British Army does not use heavy mortars anymore, preferring the hail of fire from the L16 mortars. Mechanized battalions have FV432s converted to self-propelled mortar carriers.

L16 81mm Mortar

Calibre

81mm

Length (m)

1.28

Weight of barrel (kg)

12.7

Weight loaded (kg)

35.3

Elevation (degrees)

45 to 80

Muzzle velocity (m/s)

255

Rate of fire

15 bombs per minute with well-trained crew

Ammunition:

HE L3682 4.2kg

Maximum effective range (m)

5650 (minimum range of 100m)

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The Sterling. Replaced the Sten gun gradually from 1954 when it was adopted as the standard British sub-machine gun; Main users were second-line support services, tank crewmen, engineers and artillerymen.

9mm L2A3 Sterling SMG

Calibre

9mm

Length (m)

0.482 with folded butt, 0.69m with extended butt

Length of barrel (m)

0.198

Weight empty (kg)

2.7

Weight loaded (kg)

3.5

Muzzle velocity (m/s)

390

Magazine capacity

34 rounds

Rate of fire

Cyclic 550, Practical 40

Maximum effective range (m)

200

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 Weapon Of Magnesium, Battalion Anti-Tank is a heavy 
calibre but physically lightweight recoilless anti-tank gun, 
it is fitted with an M8 0.5in spotting rifle. 
Alloys are used to keep weight down.

120mm BAT L6 Wombat

Calibre

120mm

Length (metres)

3.86

Traverse (degrees)

360

Elevation (degrees)

-8 to +17

Muzzle Velocity (m/s)

463

Weight (kg)

308

Ammunition

12.8kg HESH

Range (metres)

1,100

Rate of Fire (rounds per minute)

4

 

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Launch unit weighs 15.5kg, and the missile container is normally clipped on and served by a two or three man crew. Milan can penetrate up to 352mm of armour. During the Falklands Campaign the Milan proved very successful when used against Argentine bunkers

Milan Anti-Tank Missile

Body diameter

90mm minimum; Wing span 0.225m

Length of missile (m)

0.769

Weight loaded (kg)

11.5 with container

Launch velocity (m/s)

75 to 200 m/s

Warhead

1.45kg

Maximum effective range (m)

25 to 2,000

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Known to the troops as the "Gimpy "A successful development of the Belgian FN MAG machine gun. Effective range of the GPMG light role is 800m. In the SF role it is 1800m and using map predictive fire 3000m. A two-man team operates the weapon and a number of weapons are normally grouped in a specialist machine gun platoon. The GPMG is used at Battalion level in the fire support role.

L7A2 GPMG

Calibre

7.62mm NATO cartridge

Length (m)

1.23

Length of barrel (m)

 

Weight empty (kg)

 

Weight loaded (kg)

10.9

Muzzle velocity (m/s)

538

Magazine capacity

Belt feed

Rate of fire

Cyclic: 750-1,000 rounds per minute;
Practical: 100 light role; Sustained fire role 200rpm

Maximum effective range (m)

800 (light role); 1,800 in sustained fire role

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These were old Mark 3 Brens that had been converted to fire the new NATO 7.62 rounds.  Their barrels were chrome lined in order to reduce wear and increase barrel life.  The 7.6 2 Brens are easily identifiable by their straight magazines, introduced to hold the rimless NATO round, and by the absence of the conical flash hider that was characteristic of the old WWII. 303s.

7.62mm L4A2 LMG

Weight

9.53kg

Length

1.133m

Feed

Magazine feed

Effective Range

600m

Cyclic Rate of Fire

500 rounds per minute

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Used by the British Army in the Falklands War the M79 was designed as a close support weapon for the infantry, and was intended to bridge the gap between the maximum throwing distance of a hand grenade, and the lowest range of supporting mortar fire. An area of between 50 and 300 meters.

M79 Grenade Launcher

Calibre

40mm

Length (m)

0.737

Length of barrel (m)

0.356

Weight empty (kg)

2.72

Weight loaded (kg)

2.95

Muzzle velocity (m/s)

76

Magazine capacity

Single grenade

Rate of fire

Single shot only

Maximum effective range (m)

150 for individual targets, 400m for area targets

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Issued to British Special Forces during the Falklands Campaign it fires a 5.56 calibre round and its rate of fire is 800 rounds per minute with a muzzle velocity of 1000 metres per second; devastating at close range.

5.56mm M16 Assault Rifle

Calibre

5.56mm

Length (m)

0.99

Length of barrel (m)

0.508

Weight empty (kg)

3.1

Weight loaded (kg)

3.68 (20 round magazine); 3.82 (30 round magazine)

Muzzle velocity (m/s)

1,000

Magazine capacity

20 or 30 rounds

Rate of fire

Cyclic 700-950; Practical 40-60

Maximum effective range (m)

400

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Last version of the Lee Enfield to see active service in the British Army. The L42A1 is a 7.62-mm x 51 manually bolt-operated 10-round box magazine-fed. It comes equipped with metallic sights The rifle is fitted with a converted No. 32 Mk. 3 telescope regraduated for use with 7.62mm ammunition. This telescope is 3X, fixed focus and has a muzzle velocity of 2,748 fps. 

7.62mm L42A1 Sniper Rifle

Calibre

7.62

Length (m)

1.181

Length of barrel (m)

0.699

Weight empty (kg)

4.43

Weight loaded (kg)

 

Muzzle velocity (m/s)

838

Magazine capacity

10 rounds

Rate of fire

Single shot

Maximum effective range (m)

1,000+

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The M203 40mm Grenade Launcher is used while attached to an M16A1 5.56mm rifle. It is a lightweight, compact, breech loading, pump action, single shot launcher. 

M203 Grenade Launcher

Calibre (mm)

40mm

Weight (kg)

1.63

Range (m)

400

Rate of fire

single shot

Muzzle velocity 

246 feet per second

Weight of Missile (kg)

10.1

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Originally designed as fully amphibious with preparation but this ability was removed from British Army Scorpions. First of the CVR (T) family. Hull shape emphasizes a low, compact silhouette with a glacis that is almost horizontal. The engine is in the right front with the driver to its left. The turret is composed of upper and lower octagonal halves so joined that the turret has no vertical sides. 

FV101 Alvis Scorpion

Engine:

Jaguar J60 No.1 Mark 100B 4.235 litre 6-cylinder petrol; 190bhp at 4,750rpm

Speed in Kph (unless otherwise stated):

80.5

Range in Kilometres (Unless otherwise stated)

644

Length (in metres):

4.572

Width in metres

2.235

Height in metres

2.102

Combat weigh in kilograms

7,938

Armament:

One L23A1 76mm gun; One 7.62mm co-axial Machine gun, 3 smoke dischargers on either side of turret

Crew

3

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Samson is a derivative of the CVR (T) Vehicle (Combat Vehicle Reconnaissance Tracked) - it is the armoured recovery vehicle for all the vehicles in this class. Samson is fitted with a winch that can reach 122 metres/minute with 229 metres of wire rope. Using a 4:1 snatch block the winch can pull a load of up to 12 tons and is thus capable of pulling a load greater than the Samson itself. The vehicle is profuse with the usual array of engineering equipment and tools, and side racks hold baulks of timber for various purposes.

FV106 Samson Field Recovery Tractor

Engine:

Jaguar J60 No.1 Mark 100B 4.235 litre 190bhp

Speed in Kph (unless otherwise stated):

72.5

Range in Kilometres (Unless otherwise stated)

483

Length (in metres):

4.79

Width in metres

2.43

Height in metres

2.25

Combat weight in kilograms

8.74 tonnes

Primary Gun Armament:

7.62mm Machine Gun, Two 4 barrel smoke dischargers

Crew

3 or 4

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Scimitar is a CVR (T) vehicle (Combat Vehicle Reconnaissance Tracked) with a primary role to gather information. Used by medium reconnaissance regiments and armoured infantry units for reconnaissance, the vehicle is fitted with a Rarden 30mm cannon for self defence

FV 107 Scimitar

Engine:

Jaguar J60 No.1 Mark 100B 190bhp

Speed in Kph (unless otherwise stated):

80

Range in Kilometres (Unless otherwise stated)

644

Length (in metres):

4.9

Width in metres

2.2

Height in metres

2.096

Combat weight in kilograms

7,750

Primary Gun Armament:

1 x 30mm Rarden L21 gun, 1 x 7.62mm machine gun, two 4 barrel smoke dischargers

Crew

3

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The Bv202E was selected when the British Army took over the flank defence role in Norway, and entered service in 1968. There are various versions.

Full Tracked Articulated Carrier LHD Bv202E

Engine

Volvo type B18 petrol 91bhp 1.78 litre

Speed in Kph (unless otherwise stated)

39

Range in Kilometres (Unless otherwise stated)

400

Length (in metres)

6.172

Width in metres

1.759

Height in metres

2.21

Combat weight in kilograms

4,200

Primary Gun Armament:

One 7.62mm L7A2 Machine gun can be fitted

Crew

2 plus 8-10 troops

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The CEBARV is the only recovery vehicle in service in the UK in the amphibious role. Developed from the Centurion tank with a prefabricated turret to enable it to ford up to depths of 2.9m. The main tasks of the CEBARV are to recover drowned or broken vehicles; to "push off' beached landing craft using its built in special nose block; and to provide a breakwater for small craft and men in the water.

Centurion Beach Armoured Recovery (CEBARV)

Engine

Rolls Royce Meteor Mk 4B VEE 12 

Speed in Kph (unless otherwise stated)

33.7 forward. 12.2 reverse

Range in Kilometres (Unless otherwise stated)

400

Length (in metres)

8.077

Width in metres

3.40

Height in metres

3.45

Combat weight

40 tonnes

Crew

4

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