With tribute to:

Martin Spirit

James Paul

Co-written by:

David Carter

Britain's Small Wars

The preservation of British Military History

Bosnia 2002

"A Frustrating Mission"

NATO in Bosnia

The abandonment of the myth of peacekeeping led to the first meaningful 'peacemaking' which resulted in the Dayton Accord of November 1995. After the Dayton Accords, UNPROFOR was replaced by the NATO led Implementation Force (I-FOR). This was the first of NATO enforced peaces and NATO deployments continue today.

The British Army contributed Royal Artillery, armoured and infantry units to I-FOR in Bosnia and continues to do so today. At the height of the British involvement in Bosnia were 10,000 troops, and since the first deployment in 1992 11 members of the British forces have been killed by hostile action and a further 14 have died as a result of gunshot wounds or vehicle accidents.

IFOR was commanded by Lt. General Sir Michael Walker KCB CBE from 8th December 1994 to November 1996.

Lieutenant-General Roddy Cordy-Simpson Deputy was CO Land operations of SFOR from December 1996. Major-General John Drewienkiewicz was Chief of Staff.

The British Army contributed Royal Artillery, armoured and infantry units to I-FOR in Bosnia and continues to do so today. At the height of the British involvement in Bosnia were 10,000 troops, and since the first deployment in 1992 11 members of the British forces have been killed by hostile action and a further 14 have died as a result of gunshot wounds or vehicle accidents.

IFOR was commanded by Lt. General Sir Michael Walker KCB CBE from 8th December 1994 to November 1996.

Lieutenant-General Roddy Cordy-Simpson Deputy was CO Land operations of SFOR from December 1996. Major-General John Drewienkiewicz was Chief of Staff.